Dell Technologies Backs Girls Who Code

Girls Who Code having fun at the Dell Campus, courtesy photo.

Girls Who Code having fun at the Dell Campus, courtesy photo.

Dell Technologies has partnered with Girls Who Code to support after school computer science programs for about 15,000 girls in under-served communities across the U.S.

Dell has pledged $400,000 in a cash donation to support the program. It also appointed five women technology leaders as program ambassadors to serve as mentors to the girls in grades 6-12. Girls Who Code is a national non-profit organization working to close the gender gap in technology.

The money will go to buy materials and supplies for the after school program as well as provide funds for field trips to take the girls to tech companies. Programs will be concentrated in communities across the Great Plains and Rockies, the Southeast, the Northeast and San Francisco.

Previously, Dell supported Girls Who Code locally. It has also partnered with the Girl Scouts of the USA to support Digital Cookie 2.0 to foster entrepreneurship and an interest in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. In addition, Dell supports GirlStart, which also teaches girls about STEM opportunities and technology skills.

And at the recent Dell EMC World held in Austin, Michael Dell recognized the executive directors of the youth learning groups during his keynote address. Dell also hosted them as part of the Women in IT track at Dell EMC World.

“Never before in history has technology been so core to our economy and our society at large,” Karen Quintos, Executive Vice President and Chief Customer Officer of Dell said in a news release. “We have an incredible opportunity to truly drive human progress through technology, and we can’t realize the full potential of that without our girls. I’m so excited to partner with Girls Who Code to prepare the next generation of female leaders to grow and thrive in a connected world. When we engage and empower our girls, there is no limit to what we can achieve as a global community.”

Comments

  1. Sorry, but leaders do not code themselves. They manage coders. If you want to educate on science to bring more people into IT, you should start to find a career path. After 20-30 years into digital/computer revolution most business/government and education has still no clue about IT and how to educate, train on the job and plan careers. Most people working with a computer and many are in an IT department, but only very few do code.
    Instead we should teach on frameworks, technology and accounting. If you can read, write, count and understand IT/PM phrases, its all its takes to make someone an expert. I do not see what gender has to do with that.

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